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Former Army Medic Receives Medal of Honor for Vietnam War Heroism

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Former Army Medic Receives Medal of Honor for Vietnam War Heroism
07/31/2017 05:23 PM CDT

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In a July 31, 2017, White House ceremony, President Donald J. Trump awarded the Medal of Honor to former Army Spc. 5 James McCloughan for heroism during the Vietnam War in 1969. Army graphic

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Former Army Medic Receives Medal of Honor for Vietnam War Heroism

By David Vergun

Army News Service

WASHINGTON, July 31, 2017 — President Donald J. Trump awarded the Medal of Honor to former Army Spc. 5 James McCloughan during a White House ceremony today for heroism during the Vietnam War almost a half century ago.

McCloughan, a medic and a Vietnam veteran, was one of 89 soldiers in Company C, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, who fought on Nui Yon Hill, near the city of Tam Kỳ from May 13 to 15, 1969.

Within minutes of landing there May 13, about 2,000 enemy soldiers had them surrounded, and two of their helicopters were shot down, Trump related during the ceremony. One soldier was badly wounded in the middle of an open field. “Jim did not hesitate,” the president said. “He blazed through 100 meters of enemy fire to carry the soldier to safety.”

After tending to that soldier, McCloughan joined a mission to advance toward the enemy, Trump said. But before long, they were ambushed. Again, he ran into danger to rescue his wounded men.

As he cared for two soldiers, shrapnel from an enemy rocket-propelled grenade “slashed open the back of Jim’s body from head to foot. Yet, that terrible wound didn’t stop Jim from pulling those two men to safety, nor did it stop him from answering the plea of another wounded comrade and carrying him to safety atop his own badly injured body. And so it went, shot after shot, blast upon blast,” the president said.

“As one of his comrades recalled: ‘Whoever called ‘Medic!’ could immediately count on McCloughan. He’s a brave guy,'” Trump said.

Pleas for Help

That evening, soldiers went into their defensive position, but one didn’t make it back, and McCloughan could not ignore his pleas for help, the president related.

Again, “Doc,” as his fellow soldiers called him, did not hesitate, Trump said. “He crawled through a rice paddy thick with steel rain — that means bullets all over the place — and as soldiers watched him, they were sure that was the last time they would see Doc. They thought that was the end of their friend Jim.”

But after several minutes, McCloughan emerged from the smoke and fire, carrying yet another soldier, the president said.

As McCloughan was carrying the wounded to be medevac’d, his lieutenant ordered him to get in too. “Get in. Get in,” Trump said, conveying the lieutenant’s orders. But McCloughan refused, saying “you’re going to need me here.”

McCloughan would later say, “I’d rather die on the battlefield than know that men died because they did not have a medic,” Trump related.

Over the next 24 hours without food, water or rest, McCloughan fired at enemy soldiers, suffered a bullet wound to his arm, and continued to race into gunfire to save more and more lives, the president said.

“Though he was thousands of miles from home, it was as if the strength and pride of our whole nation was beating inside of Jim’s heart,” the president said. “He gave it his all, and then he just kept giving.”

In those 48 hours, McCloughan rescued 10 American soldiers and tended to countless others, Trump said, adding that of the 89 in the company, their strength had dwindled to 32 by the end of the fighting.

A Promise to God

On the second day of that bloody fight, McCloughan found a soldier who had been badly shot in the stomach, Trump said. He knew the soldier wouldn’t make it if he flung him on his back in a fireman’s carry, so he lifted him up and carried him in his arms. As McCloughan was carrying the soldier, a thought flashed through his mind, the president said:

“Although Jim had always been close to his father, he realized that it was not since he’d been a young boy that he had told his dad those three simple yet beautiful words: ‘I love you.'”

In that moment Jim offered up a prayer. He asked God, “If you get me out of this hell on earth so I can tell my dad I love him, then I’ll be the best coach and father you ever asked for,” the president said.

“As he prayed,” he continued, “a great peace came over him. … Jim made it out of that hell on earth. And, the first thing he did when he arrived back on American soil, was to say those beautiful words: ‘I love you dad. I love you.’ Jim said those words over and over again for the next 22 years until the last time he saw his father, the night before his dad passed on.

“Today, I venture to say, his dad is the proudest father in heaven,” Trump said. “Jim fought with all the love and courage in his soul. He was prepared to lay down his life so that his brothers in arms could live theirs.”

The president added that McCloughan kept the other part of his promise to God as well, coaching high school sports to the best of his ability for the next 38 years.

McCloughan was joined at the White House ceremony by members of his family, eight other Medal of Honor recipients, and 10 soldiers who served with him during that epic battle, five of whom McCloughan personally saved.

(Follow David Vergun on Twitter: @vergunARNEWS)

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President Presents Medal of Honor to Vietnam Veteran President Presents Medal of Honor to Vietnam Veteran
President Donald J. Trump awards the Medal of Honor to former Army Spc. 5 James C. McCloughan, for conspicuous gallantry during the Vietnam War in a ceremony at the White House, July 31, 2017.

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MOB OPP 105X (O-6) QATAR, RLD: 3/30/2018 (NE-5449-0016)

** PLEASE ONLY RESPOND USING THE LINK PROVIDED – DO NOT HIT THE “REPLY” BUTTON! **

Eligibility Requirements – Applicants who do not meet requirements will be rejected:

  1. Grade: O-6 (NO PAY SUB)
  1. Designator: 105X
  1. Clearance: TS/SCI
  1. NOBC: N/A

Billet Summary:

  1. Title: ECRC FWD CENT OIC
  1. Location: QATAR
  1. NOSC Report Date: 03/02/2018
  1. Duration: 320 Days Boots-on-Ground
  1. Type of Orders: Involuntary
  1. Planned Order Authority*: 10 USC § 12302
  1. Remarks: NAVY REPRESENTATIVE TO COMMANDERS AND STAFFS OF ALL UNITS IN NAVCENT AOR. THE OIC OF THE ECRC FWD CENT COMMAND FACILITATES AND COORDINATES MANNING ISSUES SUCH AS PAY, PERSONNEL, ADMIN AND LOGISTIC SUPPORT FOR NAVY IAS. TS/SCI CLEARANCE IS MANDATORY IN ORDER TO ATTEND BRIEFS/VTC AND PARTICIPATE IN PLANNING. LIMITED TRAVEL TO BAHRAIN REQUIRED TO MEET WITH CUSNC AND CTF-56 STAFF. REPORTS ADMINISTRATIVELY TO THE CO ECRC AND OPERATIONALY TO CTF-56. COORDINATES WITH THE NAVCENT AUGMENTATION CELL LEADER IN BAHRAIN. SUPPORT, AS NEEDED, NAVY PERSONNEL ASSIGNED IN IRAQ, KUWAIT, LEBANON,OMAN, PAKISTAN, SYRIA, JORDAN, KAZAKHSTAN, KYRGYZSTAN, TAJIKISTAN, TURKMENISTAN, UZBEKISTAN, BAHRAIN, QATAR, AFGHANISTAN, UAE AND YEMEN. TRACKING ALL ASSIGNED IA SAILORS INTO AND OUT OF NAVCENT AOR – PROVIDING NUMBERS INFORMATION TO THE AUGCELL IN BAHRAIN ON A WEEKLY BASIS; BILLETING AND TRANSIT OF NAVY PERSONNEL IN NAVCENT AOR; COORDINATION WITH ECRC FOR GEAR (RFI) ISSUANCE; PSD/PLR SUPPORT (ASSISTED BY PSD BAHRAIN), SUCH AS PROCESSING TRAVEL CLAIMS, PAY AND ENTITLEMENTS ISSUES, NAVY EXAMINATION ORDERING AND PROCTORING, COMMERCIAL AND MILITARY TRAVEL AND TICKET ISSUANCE, GARNERING NEEDED OFFICE SUPPLIES. TASK DESCRIPTION OF PRIMARY DUTIES (1) SERVES AS SENIOR NAVY OFFICER IN NAVCENT AOR FOR PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT OF IAS IN THEATER. (2) RESPONSIBLE FOR NAVY ADMINISTRATION AS SPECIFIED BY ECRC, CTF-56, AND CUSNC. (3) WILL BE INVOLVED WITH MONITORING AND REPORTING NAVY IA ACTIVITY IN NAVCENT AOR. (4) WORK CLOSELY WITH JOINT MANPOWER MANAGERS TO ENSURE ACCURATE AND TIMELY PLACEMENT OF NAVY IA PERSONNEL ON THE JMDS. (5) TRACK ALL ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES OF NAVY IA PERSONNEL IN THE AOR. (6) PROVIDE WEEKLY SITUATIONAL REPORT TO CTF-56 AND/OR ECRC. (7) ACT AS CUSNC AND ECRC REPRESENTATIVE FOR ISSUES SUCH AS AT/FP, R&R POLICY, BOG POLICY AND ASSOCIATED ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES CONCERNING IA SAILORS. MANDATORY SKILLS REQUIRED: FAMILIARIZATION WITH MS ACCESS, MS EXCEL AND MS WORD. REQUIRES EXACT PAYGRADE; DEVIATION OF ONE UP OR ONE DOWN NOT AUTHORIZED. NOMINATED POSITION THAT REQUIRES RECORDS, REVIEW, COMMANDER COMMAND COMPLETE OR RC EQUIVALENT AND APPROVAL BY CNRF AND PERS. FWD TO ECRC/NECC FOR FINAL APPROVAL. MEMBER MUST BE WITHIN NAVY PRT STANDARDS AND MUST NOT CURRENTLY BE IN A PRT “”FAILURE”” STATUS.

Application Deadline: 08/13/2017 – selection may occur prior to the deadline.

Department of Defense (DoD)

Key Steps to Recover Documents for FEMA Disaster Assistance

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You are subscribed to Region 6 News for FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency). This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Key Steps to Recover Documents for FEMA Disaster Assistance
07/31/2017 04:07 PM EDT

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Many Arkansans lost important items in the severe storms between April 26 and May 19, including documents the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management and FEMA need to process disaster assistance applications.

If papers are gone – such as birth certificates, Social Security cards, driver’s licenses, tax records, insurance policies, etc.— many can be replaced by contacting sources of information, such as vital records offices, Social Security agencies, insurance offices and other organizations or agencies.

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North Korea’s ICBM Lands in Japan’s Economic Zone, Official Says

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North Korea’s ICBM Lands in Japan’s Economic Zone, Official Says
07/31/2017 02:11 PM CDT

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A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense interceptor is launched from the Pacific Spaceport Complex Alaska in Kodiak, Alaska, during Flight Test THAAD-18, July 11, 2017. During the test, the THAAD weapon system successfully intercepted an air-launched intermediate-range ballistic missile target. Defense Department photo by Leah Garton

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North Korea’s ICBM Lands in Japan’s Economic Zone, Official Says

By Terri Moon Cronk

DoD News, Defense Media Activity

WASHINGTON, July 31, 2017 — The North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile that was launched July 28 from Mupyong-ni traveled about 620 miles before splashing down in the Sea of Japan about 103 miles from the coast of Hokkaido, Japan, the Pentagon director of press operations said today.

The U.S. Eighth Army and South Korean army personnel conducted a combined live fire exercise at first light Korea time shortly after the North Korean missile splashed down inside Japan’s Exclusive Economic Zone, Navy Capt. Jeff Davis told reporters.

“This exercise utilized the Army tactical missile system, also called ATACMS, and the [South Korean] Hyunmoo Missile-2, which fired two missiles each into territorial waters of South Korea along the east coast,” he said.

Alliance Working Together

The combined missile launches, conducted within hours of the North Korean ICBM launch, demonstrate the alliance’s ability to work together to defend South Korea, the spokesman said.

“This is a system that can be rapidly deployed and engaged, [and] provides precision capability that enables the Korea-U.S. alliance to engage a full array of time-critical targets under all weather conditions. This exercise demonstrated our precision-fire capability,” Davis added.

B-1B Bombers Activated

Also yesterday, two U.S. Air Force B-1B bombers under the command of Pacific Air Forces joined counterparts from the South Korean and Japanese air forces in sequenced bilateral missions, he said.

After the bombers took off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, they flew to Japanese airspace, where two Japan Air Self Defense Force Mitsubishi F-2 fighter jets joined them, the captain said.

“The B-1s then flew over the Korean Peninsula where they were joined by four [South Korean] Air Force F-15 [Eagle] fighter jets. The B-1s then performed a low pass over Osan Air Base, South Korea, before leaving South Korean airspace and returning to Guam,” he said.

Throughout the mission, which took about 10 hours, the air crews practiced intercept and formation training to improve their combined capabilities and tactical skills while strengthening the military-to-military relationships in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, Davis said.

“The U.S. maintains flexible bomber and fighter capabilities in the Asia-Pacific theater, retaining the ability to quickly respond to any regional threat in order to defend the U.S. homeland and in support of our allies,” he said.

THAAD Test

He said the U.S. Missile Defense Agency and soldiers from the 11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade from Fort Bliss, Texas, conducted a successful missile defense test yesterday using the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system.

“A medium-range target ballistic missile was air-launched by a U.S. Air Force C-17 [Globemaster III] over the Pacific Ocean,” Davis said. “The THAAD weapon system located at Pacific Spaceport Complex Alaska in Kodiak, Alaska, detected, tracked and intercepted the target.”

That was the 15th successful intercept in 15 tests for THAAD, he noted.

Six activated THAAD batteries exist: three batteries are stationed at Fort Bliss, one battery is forward-deployed to Guam, one is deployed to South Korea, and one is stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, the captain said.

The spokesman explained that THAAD, which is strictly a defensive weapon system, provides a globally transportable, rapidly deployable capability to intercept ballistic missiles inside or outside the atmosphere during their final, or terminal, of flight.

“Our commitment to the defense of our allies, [South] Korea and Japan, in the face of these threats, remains ironclad,” Davis said.

(Follow Terri Moon Cronk on Twitter: @MoonCronkDOD)

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