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How Israel Hid Its Secret Nuclear Weapons Program

An exclusive look inside newly declassified documents shows how Israel blocked U.S. efforts to uncover its secret nuclear reactor.


By AVNER COHEN and WILLIAM BURR, April 15, 2015

 

Lead image by Courtesy of National Security Archives.


For decades, the world has known that the massive Israeli facility near Dimona, in the Negev Desert, was the key to its secret nuclear project. Yet, for decades, the world—and Israel—knew that Israel had once misleadingly referred to it as a “textile factory.” Until now, though, we’ve never known how that myth began—and how quickly the United States saw through it. The answers, as it turns out, are part of a fascinating tale that played out in the closing weeks of the Eisenhower administration—a story that begins with the father of Secretary of State John Kerry and a familiar charge that the U.S. intelligence community failed to “connect the dots.

Read more about this investigation at Politico Magazine –  How Israel Hid Its Secret Nuclear Weapons Program


About the authors:

Avner Cohen is a professor of nonproliferation studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and the author of Israel and the Bomb.

William Burr is a senior analyst at the National Security Archive, George Washington University, where he directs the Archive’s Nuclear Documentation Project and edits its special Web page, The Nuclear Vault.



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Defense Early Bird Briefs – April 3, 2015

 
Here are the descriptions and links to news from everything defense. Troops, military contracts, by branch of service, Congress, U.S. Senate and the Executive Branch, etc. 
I generally get this list every day before noon, and I will have it up on this site as soon as I can.
 
There is a lot of news coming out of our military and other defense issues, policies, etc. The editors over at the Military Times do a great job compiling the news by branch of service, by country, by industry contracts, by pending legislation in Congress or the Senate, and so one.
 
The following information was collected and compiled by the editors of the Defense and Military Times magazine. Known as the Early Bird Brief, this was edited by Oriana Pawlyk (opawlyk@militarytimes.com), and I present it here as it appears from my email.

TODAY’S TOP 5

1. Iran Agrees to Framework of Nuclear Deal
(New York Times) Iran and the world powers said here Thursday that they had reached a surprisingly specific and comprehensive general understanding about the next steps in limiting Tehran’s nuclear program, though Western officials said many details needed to be resolved before a final agreement in June.   

2. Saudi Air War Over Yemen Leaves U.S. on Sidelines
(Time) History makes it almost relaxing for the U.S. military to be sitting out the latest air war launched by Saudi Arabia against the Houthi rebels now occupying a growing chunk of Yemen.   

3. Kenya massacre points up country’s weakness against Somali militants(Los Angeles Times) It took just four gunmen to demonstrate Kenya’s impotence against the Somali militant group Shabab.   

4. Pentagon authorizes refueling help for Yemen campaign
(USA Today) The Pentagon has agreed to provide aerial refueling support for Saudi and allied pilots attacking Houthi rebels in Yemen, an expansion of the U.S. military’s role in the conflict, a Defense Department official said Thursday.   

5. More military tobacco restrictions likely
(Military Times) Raising tobacco prices and expanding tobacco-free areas on military bases are two options for discouraging use that will be presented to Defense Secretary Ash Carter by an advisory committee, according to a defense spokeswoman.  

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